Fundamental Research Health Industrial Applications Science Highlights

Revolution in imaging with neutrons

An international research team at the Research Neutron Source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed a new imaging technology. In the future, this technology could not only improve the resolution of neutron measurements by many times, but could also reduce the radiation dose for medical x-ray imaging.

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Fundamental Research Science Highlights

Monte-Carlo calculated detector response functions to unfold radiative neutron capture spectra

A complete set of detector response functions, i.e. the gamma spectra corresponding to incremental gamma-ray energies up to 12 MeV, were obtained for the Budapest PGAA facility by geant4 Monte-Carlo simulations and were used to unfold the experimental prompt-gamma spectra, for use in nuclear physics.

The unfolding successfully removed the continuous Compton-background and the escape peaks related to a full-energy peak but preserved the shape and area of the full-energy peak itself.

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Fundamental Research Science Highlights

Structuring of nanoparticle suspension probed by neutron reflectivity

The behaviour of colloidal particles at water-solid interfaces is relevant in material science, food processing, medicine and environmental engineering. A team from the University of Geneva with researchers from the Budapest Neutron Centre used neutron reflectivity to study colloidal silica nanoparticle suspensions near the (negatively) like-charged native-oxide-covered surface of Si. Intriguingly, the nanospheres develop a self-organised damped, oscillatory concentration profile normal to the interface, as demonstrated in the figure.

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Fundamental Research Next generation batteries Science Highlights

Designing the next generation of electronics using neutron science

An international team are using neutron science to help develop the next generation of electronic devices. The researchers from the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL) and other institutions are experimenting with the design of semiconductors, which form an essential component of modern computer chips. They hope their studies could herald the future of electronics through the use of organic materials and bespoke designs.

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