Fundamental Research Health Science Highlights

Smartly solved: How molecules release active ingredients in a targeted way

Smart molecules can change their shape and properties depending on temperature or other parameters such as macromolecular architecture. In pharmaceutic applications, they release active ingredients in a targeted manner at the desired locations. Neutrons at the MLZ reveal these nanostructures and help specifically design new molecules with desired properties.

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Fundamental Research Science Highlights

Analysis of cosmic dust brings scientists one step closer to quantum and magnonic devices

New research published in Science brings us a step closer to magnonic devices and quantum computing. Neutron analysis has revealed the behaviour of magnetic waves in a class of materials, enabling scientists to picture a future where electronic currents no longer cause our devices to heat up.

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Fundamental Research Science Highlights

Neutrons unravel 50-year-old physics mystery

More than 50 years ago, researchers discovered a pronounced phase transition in strontium iron oxide at room temperature. However, what exactly happens in this process at the atomic level has been unclear ever since. Using high-resolution neutron measurements, a research team from the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Center (MLZ) has now been able to solve this old mystery.

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Fundamental Research Health Industrial Applications Science Highlights

Revolution in imaging with neutrons

An international research team at the Research Neutron Source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed a new imaging technology. In the future, this technology could not only improve the resolution of neutron measurements by many times, but could also reduce the radiation dose for medical x-ray imaging.

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Fundamental Research Science Highlights

Monte-Carlo calculated detector response functions to unfold radiative neutron capture spectra

A complete set of detector response functions, i.e. the gamma spectra corresponding to incremental gamma-ray energies up to 12 MeV, were obtained for the Budapest PGAA facility by geant4 Monte-Carlo simulations and were used to unfold the experimental prompt-gamma spectra, for use in nuclear physics.

The unfolding successfully removed the continuous Compton-background and the escape peaks related to a full-energy peak but preserved the shape and area of the full-energy peak itself.

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