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The League of advanced European Neutron Sources, LENS, is a not-for-profit consortium working to promote cooperation between European-level neutron infrastructure providers offering transnational user programs to external researchers.

Neutron Science in Europe

In Europe, there is a world-leading network of international and national neutron sources serving a scientific community of more than 5,000 researchers with over 32,000 instrument days per year. Nine of these form a strategic consortium with the aim of strengthening European neutron science by enhancing collaboration among the facilities. LENS places emphasis on the relationship between user communities and funding organisations, continuous improvement of source facilities, optimising resources between and aligning policies among partners—all to ensure excellence to the communities they serve. Read more about LENS.

Recent Science Highlights from LENS Members

Engineered disorder

A study using neutrons at the MLZ suggests that developing a solid electrolyte, while intentionally leaving the material disordered, will lead to higher battery performance.
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Engineered disorder

Smartly solved: How molecules release active ingredients in a targeted way

Smart molecules can change their shape and properties depending on temperature or other parameters such as macromolecular architecture. In pharmaceutic applications, they release active ingredients in a targeted manner at the desired locations. Neutrons at the MLZ reveal these nanostructures and help specifically design new molecules with desired properties.
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Smartly solved: How molecules release active ingredients in a targeted way

Small-angle scattering techniques offer new insight towards the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

Aggregates of amyloid beta- (Aβ-)peptide, known as fibrils, are one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease and play a key role in the sequence of events leading to dementia symptoms. Using small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering, researchers from Lund University and the Paul Scherrer Institut have determined the detailed structure of Aβ42-fibril, obtaining important information to design future therapeutics.
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Small-angle scattering techniques offer new insight towards the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

Testing the resilience of electronics for the Internet of Things

Using the ChipIr instrument at the ISIS Neutron and Muon Facility, researchers have studied how ultralow power system-on-chip is affected by the neutron flux in the atmosphere. This study may be helpful in future design of such devices to be more resilient to particle hits.
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Testing the resilience of electronics for the Internet of Things

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